DC

// Some nostalgia //

Seeing as it’s May 1st and you guys are making the BIG decision, I felt that it’d be fitting to share a little, sentimental moment I had yesterday that makes me think about you, the incoming, Fall 2014 class :)

Last night I was sifting through a storage container that I keep in my closet. I was trying to find some old photographs to put up on my wall. I hadn’t looked through this container for a while and I had totally forgotten about what I chose to store in it. While rediscovering some old memorabilia, I came across the beautiful, white, embossed, Bennington folder that all of you know so well. While mine is all torn and has grayed over time, I quickly and carefully, as if it were some delicate artifact, pulled it out of the container and opened it up.

In it were all the familiar, brown and cream-colored, Bennington letters that I had received my high school, senior year (2 years ago at this point). I had kept all the letters that I got from when I visited the campus, my acceptance letter, my financial aid award letter, and the best one yet, the letter that was placed in the folder that I got when I arrived to campus for Orientation in the fall of 2012. I read through it and I have to say that I couldn’t help but get a little teary when I came across this part of the quote by Peter Dinklage ‘91: “Everyone you need is in this room…together, we have the potential to build something extraordinary.” 

While I probably read this that very day and glossed over it because I was so overly excited to finally be here, reading it 2 years later made made me think about how true this statement is now that I’m half way through my time here at Bennington. 

Everyone that I need is here. It re-enforced every deeply emotional, personal and intellectual conversation and shared experience I’ve had with my teachers and friends here on campus. Two years ago, I never thought how lucky I’d be to learn and create in an environment where the relationships that I’d create would last beyond my time here — and trust me, I can say this with much certainty even though I still have two years left.

"We most warmly welcome you to this shared adventure." As if the quote before wasn’t enough, this final statement at the end of the letter is what really got me.

I hope that each and every one of you who today made the decision to join the family are ready to dive into what will surely be your own unique adventure within our collective, shared adventure that it is to be a student at Bennington College.

~Doug ‘16~


benningtonstudents:

S K E T C H B O O K S N E A K P E A K  //  from paper to process & product 
click photographs for a closer look and captions!
I thought that I’d shine some light on the project that I’ve embarked on this term, as of two weeks ago; it will continue to be my focus and anchoring project for the second half of this term in which my studies in Slip Casting, Metal Workshop, Video Installation, and Color Investigated Through Light this term will culminate. 
I’m taking on the idea of memory and it’s influence on the associations we carry and project onto our possessions. Whether found, given or even at one point, taken, our day to day possessions and even more interestingly the less utilitarian, precious objects we hold onto and travel with through the years hold the ability to mark significant, past experiences. Questions constantly come up: Why do we hold on to certain things? Do we hold on to objects in order to hold onto it’s associated memory or person? What do our possessions and the ways we preserve them say about our past and present? 
I’m taking 8 personal objects that I’ve held onto over the years, most of them given to me by significant people in my past and even the present. Each of these objects possess their own, unique physical characteristics in weight, color, texture and their own unique, significant sentiment. Somehow these objects, which were not mine at some point, have become my own - symbolic of a past that is very much a part of who I am at this very moment. 
The most exciting aspect about working in ceramics, particularly with porcelain slip and plaster molds, is that you have the ability to endlessly multiply and copy in a very delicate and beautiful material. That being said, I’m interested in the transformation that these unique objects will go through as I strip them of their physical attributes, attached visual connotation and inherent, unique singularity through producing a large quantity of delicate, porcelain copies and revoking their original context, while assigning them a new one. 
The end result will be a large, “beaded curtain”, about 8 ft. x 20 ft., made of these porcelain copies that will be strung together. It will serve as the walls of an enclosed space, big enough for one person to enter at a time that mimics the space of an ambulatory. I’m curious about sacred spaces and how they facilitate and/or dictate physical movement as well as psychological responses. Inside this enclosed space, an individual will be able to experience the reflections of a video-loop, mainly an exploration in color and emotional response, that will project from a metal pedestal onto reflective acrylics. I’m interested in how each person will experience such restricted movement, in a delicate and fragile environment that will demand and attract visual attention centrally. 
So far I’ve just started and have a very long way to go and as a Bennington student, I know very well to keep my mind and my sketchbook open to any influences in working on this project. The biggest thing I’ve learned this term, in working with metal and ceramics, is that a work of art is never really done - a project or a piece only informs the next. It’s important to allow for discovery, mistakes, illumination in working because there’s only so much one can plan for and control with certain materials and processes. 
I’ll keep y’all updated on my progress!! 
~~Doug ‘16~~
benningtonstudents:

S K E T C H B O O K S N E A K P E A K  //  from paper to process & product 
click photographs for a closer look and captions!
I thought that I’d shine some light on the project that I’ve embarked on this term, as of two weeks ago; it will continue to be my focus and anchoring project for the second half of this term in which my studies in Slip Casting, Metal Workshop, Video Installation, and Color Investigated Through Light this term will culminate. 
I’m taking on the idea of memory and it’s influence on the associations we carry and project onto our possessions. Whether found, given or even at one point, taken, our day to day possessions and even more interestingly the less utilitarian, precious objects we hold onto and travel with through the years hold the ability to mark significant, past experiences. Questions constantly come up: Why do we hold on to certain things? Do we hold on to objects in order to hold onto it’s associated memory or person? What do our possessions and the ways we preserve them say about our past and present? 
I’m taking 8 personal objects that I’ve held onto over the years, most of them given to me by significant people in my past and even the present. Each of these objects possess their own, unique physical characteristics in weight, color, texture and their own unique, significant sentiment. Somehow these objects, which were not mine at some point, have become my own - symbolic of a past that is very much a part of who I am at this very moment. 
The most exciting aspect about working in ceramics, particularly with porcelain slip and plaster molds, is that you have the ability to endlessly multiply and copy in a very delicate and beautiful material. That being said, I’m interested in the transformation that these unique objects will go through as I strip them of their physical attributes, attached visual connotation and inherent, unique singularity through producing a large quantity of delicate, porcelain copies and revoking their original context, while assigning them a new one. 
The end result will be a large, “beaded curtain”, about 8 ft. x 20 ft., made of these porcelain copies that will be strung together. It will serve as the walls of an enclosed space, big enough for one person to enter at a time that mimics the space of an ambulatory. I’m curious about sacred spaces and how they facilitate and/or dictate physical movement as well as psychological responses. Inside this enclosed space, an individual will be able to experience the reflections of a video-loop, mainly an exploration in color and emotional response, that will project from a metal pedestal onto reflective acrylics. I’m interested in how each person will experience such restricted movement, in a delicate and fragile environment that will demand and attract visual attention centrally. 
So far I’ve just started and have a very long way to go and as a Bennington student, I know very well to keep my mind and my sketchbook open to any influences in working on this project. The biggest thing I’ve learned this term, in working with metal and ceramics, is that a work of art is never really done - a project or a piece only informs the next. It’s important to allow for discovery, mistakes, illumination in working because there’s only so much one can plan for and control with certain materials and processes. 
I’ll keep y’all updated on my progress!! 
~~Doug ‘16~~
benningtonstudents:

S K E T C H B O O K S N E A K P E A K  //  from paper to process & product 
click photographs for a closer look and captions!
I thought that I’d shine some light on the project that I’ve embarked on this term, as of two weeks ago; it will continue to be my focus and anchoring project for the second half of this term in which my studies in Slip Casting, Metal Workshop, Video Installation, and Color Investigated Through Light this term will culminate. 
I’m taking on the idea of memory and it’s influence on the associations we carry and project onto our possessions. Whether found, given or even at one point, taken, our day to day possessions and even more interestingly the less utilitarian, precious objects we hold onto and travel with through the years hold the ability to mark significant, past experiences. Questions constantly come up: Why do we hold on to certain things? Do we hold on to objects in order to hold onto it’s associated memory or person? What do our possessions and the ways we preserve them say about our past and present? 
I’m taking 8 personal objects that I’ve held onto over the years, most of them given to me by significant people in my past and even the present. Each of these objects possess their own, unique physical characteristics in weight, color, texture and their own unique, significant sentiment. Somehow these objects, which were not mine at some point, have become my own - symbolic of a past that is very much a part of who I am at this very moment. 
The most exciting aspect about working in ceramics, particularly with porcelain slip and plaster molds, is that you have the ability to endlessly multiply and copy in a very delicate and beautiful material. That being said, I’m interested in the transformation that these unique objects will go through as I strip them of their physical attributes, attached visual connotation and inherent, unique singularity through producing a large quantity of delicate, porcelain copies and revoking their original context, while assigning them a new one. 
The end result will be a large, “beaded curtain”, about 8 ft. x 20 ft., made of these porcelain copies that will be strung together. It will serve as the walls of an enclosed space, big enough for one person to enter at a time that mimics the space of an ambulatory. I’m curious about sacred spaces and how they facilitate and/or dictate physical movement as well as psychological responses. Inside this enclosed space, an individual will be able to experience the reflections of a video-loop, mainly an exploration in color and emotional response, that will project from a metal pedestal onto reflective acrylics. I’m interested in how each person will experience such restricted movement, in a delicate and fragile environment that will demand and attract visual attention centrally. 
So far I’ve just started and have a very long way to go and as a Bennington student, I know very well to keep my mind and my sketchbook open to any influences in working on this project. The biggest thing I’ve learned this term, in working with metal and ceramics, is that a work of art is never really done - a project or a piece only informs the next. It’s important to allow for discovery, mistakes, illumination in working because there’s only so much one can plan for and control with certain materials and processes. 
I’ll keep y’all updated on my progress!! 
~~Doug ‘16~~
benningtonstudents:

S K E T C H B O O K S N E A K P E A K  //  from paper to process & product 
click photographs for a closer look and captions!
I thought that I’d shine some light on the project that I’ve embarked on this term, as of two weeks ago; it will continue to be my focus and anchoring project for the second half of this term in which my studies in Slip Casting, Metal Workshop, Video Installation, and Color Investigated Through Light this term will culminate. 
I’m taking on the idea of memory and it’s influence on the associations we carry and project onto our possessions. Whether found, given or even at one point, taken, our day to day possessions and even more interestingly the less utilitarian, precious objects we hold onto and travel with through the years hold the ability to mark significant, past experiences. Questions constantly come up: Why do we hold on to certain things? Do we hold on to objects in order to hold onto it’s associated memory or person? What do our possessions and the ways we preserve them say about our past and present? 
I’m taking 8 personal objects that I’ve held onto over the years, most of them given to me by significant people in my past and even the present. Each of these objects possess their own, unique physical characteristics in weight, color, texture and their own unique, significant sentiment. Somehow these objects, which were not mine at some point, have become my own - symbolic of a past that is very much a part of who I am at this very moment. 
The most exciting aspect about working in ceramics, particularly with porcelain slip and plaster molds, is that you have the ability to endlessly multiply and copy in a very delicate and beautiful material. That being said, I’m interested in the transformation that these unique objects will go through as I strip them of their physical attributes, attached visual connotation and inherent, unique singularity through producing a large quantity of delicate, porcelain copies and revoking their original context, while assigning them a new one. 
The end result will be a large, “beaded curtain”, about 8 ft. x 20 ft., made of these porcelain copies that will be strung together. It will serve as the walls of an enclosed space, big enough for one person to enter at a time that mimics the space of an ambulatory. I’m curious about sacred spaces and how they facilitate and/or dictate physical movement as well as psychological responses. Inside this enclosed space, an individual will be able to experience the reflections of a video-loop, mainly an exploration in color and emotional response, that will project from a metal pedestal onto reflective acrylics. I’m interested in how each person will experience such restricted movement, in a delicate and fragile environment that will demand and attract visual attention centrally. 
So far I’ve just started and have a very long way to go and as a Bennington student, I know very well to keep my mind and my sketchbook open to any influences in working on this project. The biggest thing I’ve learned this term, in working with metal and ceramics, is that a work of art is never really done - a project or a piece only informs the next. It’s important to allow for discovery, mistakes, illumination in working because there’s only so much one can plan for and control with certain materials and processes. 
I’ll keep y’all updated on my progress!! 
~~Doug ‘16~~
benningtonstudents:

S K E T C H B O O K S N E A K P E A K  //  from paper to process & product 
click photographs for a closer look and captions!
I thought that I’d shine some light on the project that I’ve embarked on this term, as of two weeks ago; it will continue to be my focus and anchoring project for the second half of this term in which my studies in Slip Casting, Metal Workshop, Video Installation, and Color Investigated Through Light this term will culminate. 
I’m taking on the idea of memory and it’s influence on the associations we carry and project onto our possessions. Whether found, given or even at one point, taken, our day to day possessions and even more interestingly the less utilitarian, precious objects we hold onto and travel with through the years hold the ability to mark significant, past experiences. Questions constantly come up: Why do we hold on to certain things? Do we hold on to objects in order to hold onto it’s associated memory or person? What do our possessions and the ways we preserve them say about our past and present? 
I’m taking 8 personal objects that I’ve held onto over the years, most of them given to me by significant people in my past and even the present. Each of these objects possess their own, unique physical characteristics in weight, color, texture and their own unique, significant sentiment. Somehow these objects, which were not mine at some point, have become my own - symbolic of a past that is very much a part of who I am at this very moment. 
The most exciting aspect about working in ceramics, particularly with porcelain slip and plaster molds, is that you have the ability to endlessly multiply and copy in a very delicate and beautiful material. That being said, I’m interested in the transformation that these unique objects will go through as I strip them of their physical attributes, attached visual connotation and inherent, unique singularity through producing a large quantity of delicate, porcelain copies and revoking their original context, while assigning them a new one. 
The end result will be a large, “beaded curtain”, about 8 ft. x 20 ft., made of these porcelain copies that will be strung together. It will serve as the walls of an enclosed space, big enough for one person to enter at a time that mimics the space of an ambulatory. I’m curious about sacred spaces and how they facilitate and/or dictate physical movement as well as psychological responses. Inside this enclosed space, an individual will be able to experience the reflections of a video-loop, mainly an exploration in color and emotional response, that will project from a metal pedestal onto reflective acrylics. I’m interested in how each person will experience such restricted movement, in a delicate and fragile environment that will demand and attract visual attention centrally. 
So far I’ve just started and have a very long way to go and as a Bennington student, I know very well to keep my mind and my sketchbook open to any influences in working on this project. The biggest thing I’ve learned this term, in working with metal and ceramics, is that a work of art is never really done - a project or a piece only informs the next. It’s important to allow for discovery, mistakes, illumination in working because there’s only so much one can plan for and control with certain materials and processes. 
I’ll keep y’all updated on my progress!! 
~~Doug ‘16~~
benningtonstudents:

S K E T C H B O O K S N E A K P E A K  //  from paper to process & product 
click photographs for a closer look and captions!
I thought that I’d shine some light on the project that I’ve embarked on this term, as of two weeks ago; it will continue to be my focus and anchoring project for the second half of this term in which my studies in Slip Casting, Metal Workshop, Video Installation, and Color Investigated Through Light this term will culminate. 
I’m taking on the idea of memory and it’s influence on the associations we carry and project onto our possessions. Whether found, given or even at one point, taken, our day to day possessions and even more interestingly the less utilitarian, precious objects we hold onto and travel with through the years hold the ability to mark significant, past experiences. Questions constantly come up: Why do we hold on to certain things? Do we hold on to objects in order to hold onto it’s associated memory or person? What do our possessions and the ways we preserve them say about our past and present? 
I’m taking 8 personal objects that I’ve held onto over the years, most of them given to me by significant people in my past and even the present. Each of these objects possess their own, unique physical characteristics in weight, color, texture and their own unique, significant sentiment. Somehow these objects, which were not mine at some point, have become my own - symbolic of a past that is very much a part of who I am at this very moment. 
The most exciting aspect about working in ceramics, particularly with porcelain slip and plaster molds, is that you have the ability to endlessly multiply and copy in a very delicate and beautiful material. That being said, I’m interested in the transformation that these unique objects will go through as I strip them of their physical attributes, attached visual connotation and inherent, unique singularity through producing a large quantity of delicate, porcelain copies and revoking their original context, while assigning them a new one. 
The end result will be a large, “beaded curtain”, about 8 ft. x 20 ft., made of these porcelain copies that will be strung together. It will serve as the walls of an enclosed space, big enough for one person to enter at a time that mimics the space of an ambulatory. I’m curious about sacred spaces and how they facilitate and/or dictate physical movement as well as psychological responses. Inside this enclosed space, an individual will be able to experience the reflections of a video-loop, mainly an exploration in color and emotional response, that will project from a metal pedestal onto reflective acrylics. I’m interested in how each person will experience such restricted movement, in a delicate and fragile environment that will demand and attract visual attention centrally. 
So far I’ve just started and have a very long way to go and as a Bennington student, I know very well to keep my mind and my sketchbook open to any influences in working on this project. The biggest thing I’ve learned this term, in working with metal and ceramics, is that a work of art is never really done - a project or a piece only informs the next. It’s important to allow for discovery, mistakes, illumination in working because there’s only so much one can plan for and control with certain materials and processes. 
I’ll keep y’all updated on my progress!! 
~~Doug ‘16~~
benningtonstudents:

S K E T C H B O O K S N E A K P E A K  //  from paper to process & product 
click photographs for a closer look and captions!
I thought that I’d shine some light on the project that I’ve embarked on this term, as of two weeks ago; it will continue to be my focus and anchoring project for the second half of this term in which my studies in Slip Casting, Metal Workshop, Video Installation, and Color Investigated Through Light this term will culminate. 
I’m taking on the idea of memory and it’s influence on the associations we carry and project onto our possessions. Whether found, given or even at one point, taken, our day to day possessions and even more interestingly the less utilitarian, precious objects we hold onto and travel with through the years hold the ability to mark significant, past experiences. Questions constantly come up: Why do we hold on to certain things? Do we hold on to objects in order to hold onto it’s associated memory or person? What do our possessions and the ways we preserve them say about our past and present? 
I’m taking 8 personal objects that I’ve held onto over the years, most of them given to me by significant people in my past and even the present. Each of these objects possess their own, unique physical characteristics in weight, color, texture and their own unique, significant sentiment. Somehow these objects, which were not mine at some point, have become my own - symbolic of a past that is very much a part of who I am at this very moment. 
The most exciting aspect about working in ceramics, particularly with porcelain slip and plaster molds, is that you have the ability to endlessly multiply and copy in a very delicate and beautiful material. That being said, I’m interested in the transformation that these unique objects will go through as I strip them of their physical attributes, attached visual connotation and inherent, unique singularity through producing a large quantity of delicate, porcelain copies and revoking their original context, while assigning them a new one. 
The end result will be a large, “beaded curtain”, about 8 ft. x 20 ft., made of these porcelain copies that will be strung together. It will serve as the walls of an enclosed space, big enough for one person to enter at a time that mimics the space of an ambulatory. I’m curious about sacred spaces and how they facilitate and/or dictate physical movement as well as psychological responses. Inside this enclosed space, an individual will be able to experience the reflections of a video-loop, mainly an exploration in color and emotional response, that will project from a metal pedestal onto reflective acrylics. I’m interested in how each person will experience such restricted movement, in a delicate and fragile environment that will demand and attract visual attention centrally. 
So far I’ve just started and have a very long way to go and as a Bennington student, I know very well to keep my mind and my sketchbook open to any influences in working on this project. The biggest thing I’ve learned this term, in working with metal and ceramics, is that a work of art is never really done - a project or a piece only informs the next. It’s important to allow for discovery, mistakes, illumination in working because there’s only so much one can plan for and control with certain materials and processes. 
I’ll keep y’all updated on my progress!! 
~~Doug ‘16~~
benningtonstudents:

S K E T C H B O O K S N E A K P E A K  //  from paper to process & product 
click photographs for a closer look and captions!
I thought that I’d shine some light on the project that I’ve embarked on this term, as of two weeks ago; it will continue to be my focus and anchoring project for the second half of this term in which my studies in Slip Casting, Metal Workshop, Video Installation, and Color Investigated Through Light this term will culminate. 
I’m taking on the idea of memory and it’s influence on the associations we carry and project onto our possessions. Whether found, given or even at one point, taken, our day to day possessions and even more interestingly the less utilitarian, precious objects we hold onto and travel with through the years hold the ability to mark significant, past experiences. Questions constantly come up: Why do we hold on to certain things? Do we hold on to objects in order to hold onto it’s associated memory or person? What do our possessions and the ways we preserve them say about our past and present? 
I’m taking 8 personal objects that I’ve held onto over the years, most of them given to me by significant people in my past and even the present. Each of these objects possess their own, unique physical characteristics in weight, color, texture and their own unique, significant sentiment. Somehow these objects, which were not mine at some point, have become my own - symbolic of a past that is very much a part of who I am at this very moment. 
The most exciting aspect about working in ceramics, particularly with porcelain slip and plaster molds, is that you have the ability to endlessly multiply and copy in a very delicate and beautiful material. That being said, I’m interested in the transformation that these unique objects will go through as I strip them of their physical attributes, attached visual connotation and inherent, unique singularity through producing a large quantity of delicate, porcelain copies and revoking their original context, while assigning them a new one. 
The end result will be a large, “beaded curtain”, about 8 ft. x 20 ft., made of these porcelain copies that will be strung together. It will serve as the walls of an enclosed space, big enough for one person to enter at a time that mimics the space of an ambulatory. I’m curious about sacred spaces and how they facilitate and/or dictate physical movement as well as psychological responses. Inside this enclosed space, an individual will be able to experience the reflections of a video-loop, mainly an exploration in color and emotional response, that will project from a metal pedestal onto reflective acrylics. I’m interested in how each person will experience such restricted movement, in a delicate and fragile environment that will demand and attract visual attention centrally. 
So far I’ve just started and have a very long way to go and as a Bennington student, I know very well to keep my mind and my sketchbook open to any influences in working on this project. The biggest thing I’ve learned this term, in working with metal and ceramics, is that a work of art is never really done - a project or a piece only informs the next. It’s important to allow for discovery, mistakes, illumination in working because there’s only so much one can plan for and control with certain materials and processes. 
I’ll keep y’all updated on my progress!! 
~~Doug ‘16~~

benningtonstudents:

S K E T C H B O O K S N E A K P E A K  //  from paper to process & product 

click photographs for a closer look and captions!

I thought that I’d shine some light on the project that I’ve embarked on this term, as of two weeks ago; it will continue to be my focus and anchoring project for the second half of this term in which my studies in Slip Casting, Metal Workshop, Video Installation, and Color Investigated Through Light this term will culminate. 

I’m taking on the idea of memory and it’s influence on the associations we carry and project onto our possessions. Whether found, given or even at one point, taken, our day to day possessions and even more interestingly the less utilitarian, precious objects we hold onto and travel with through the years hold the ability to mark significant, past experiences. Questions constantly come up: Why do we hold on to certain things? Do we hold on to objects in order to hold onto it’s associated memory or person? What do our possessions and the ways we preserve them say about our past and present? 

I’m taking 8 personal objects that I’ve held onto over the years, most of them given to me by significant people in my past and even the present. Each of these objects possess their own, unique physical characteristics in weight, color, texture and their own unique, significant sentiment. Somehow these objects, which were not mine at some point, have become my own - symbolic of a past that is very much a part of who I am at this very moment. 

The most exciting aspect about working in ceramics, particularly with porcelain slip and plaster molds, is that you have the ability to endlessly multiply and copy in a very delicate and beautiful material. That being said, I’m interested in the transformation that these unique objects will go through as I strip them of their physical attributes, attached visual connotation and inherent, unique singularity through producing a large quantity of delicate, porcelain copies and revoking their original context, while assigning them a new one. 

The end result will be a large, “beaded curtain”, about 8 ft. x 20 ft., made of these porcelain copies that will be strung together. It will serve as the walls of an enclosed space, big enough for one person to enter at a time that mimics the space of an ambulatory. I’m curious about sacred spaces and how they facilitate and/or dictate physical movement as well as psychological responses. Inside this enclosed space, an individual will be able to experience the reflections of a video-loop, mainly an exploration in color and emotional response, that will project from a metal pedestal onto reflective acrylics. I’m interested in how each person will experience such restricted movement, in a delicate and fragile environment that will demand and attract visual attention centrally. 

So far I’ve just started and have a very long way to go and as a Bennington student, I know very well to keep my mind and my sketchbook open to any influences in working on this project. The biggest thing I’ve learned this term, in working with metal and ceramics, is that a work of art is never really done - a project or a piece only informs the next. It’s important to allow for discovery, mistakes, illumination in working because there’s only so much one can plan for and control with certain materials and processes. 

I’ll keep y’all updated on my progress!! 

~~Doug ‘16~~


Because Bennington does not require SAT scores, does that mean that the scores are not heavily weighted in the decision to be accepted to the school even if the scores are sent? from misswolfgallery

benningtonstudents:

I’d start off by saying that here in the Admissions Office at Bennington, we really care about getting to know who you are. Everything that is submitted in a given application, including writing samples, any additional supplemental material and your SAT/ACT scores (which are optional), simply gives us a better sense of your context. If you feel that your scores aren’t a necessary part of that window through which we get to you better, than that’s fine too. 

We prefer to take a look and evaluate your larger picture rather than allowing one aspect to have too much weight. 

~~Doug ‘16~~


Just a little peak into some of the classes that I’m taking this term ~
The first photo is of my friend Whitney Davis, who transferred to Bennington this year, practicing cutting strips of steel with an Acetylene + Oxygen gas mixture in Metal Workshop. Staying safe is important in the shop…trust me. 
The second photo is of my plaster, three part mold of a water bottle that we had to make as an exercise for Intro to Slip Casting. The photo after that is of our teacher and artist Yoko Inoue, demonstrating how to make a mold of a more organic object and shape - ginger! Yoko has so far been one of the most influential and inspiring teachers I’ve studied with here at Bennington. 
The last photo is just of Commons from the End of the World on Commons lawn. The nights are getting shorter and shorter…Just a little peak into some of the classes that I’m taking this term ~
The first photo is of my friend Whitney Davis, who transferred to Bennington this year, practicing cutting strips of steel with an Acetylene + Oxygen gas mixture in Metal Workshop. Staying safe is important in the shop…trust me. 
The second photo is of my plaster, three part mold of a water bottle that we had to make as an exercise for Intro to Slip Casting. The photo after that is of our teacher and artist Yoko Inoue, demonstrating how to make a mold of a more organic object and shape - ginger! Yoko has so far been one of the most influential and inspiring teachers I’ve studied with here at Bennington. 
The last photo is just of Commons from the End of the World on Commons lawn. The nights are getting shorter and shorter…Just a little peak into some of the classes that I’m taking this term ~
The first photo is of my friend Whitney Davis, who transferred to Bennington this year, practicing cutting strips of steel with an Acetylene + Oxygen gas mixture in Metal Workshop. Staying safe is important in the shop…trust me. 
The second photo is of my plaster, three part mold of a water bottle that we had to make as an exercise for Intro to Slip Casting. The photo after that is of our teacher and artist Yoko Inoue, demonstrating how to make a mold of a more organic object and shape - ginger! Yoko has so far been one of the most influential and inspiring teachers I’ve studied with here at Bennington. 
The last photo is just of Commons from the End of the World on Commons lawn. The nights are getting shorter and shorter…Just a little peak into some of the classes that I’m taking this term ~
The first photo is of my friend Whitney Davis, who transferred to Bennington this year, practicing cutting strips of steel with an Acetylene + Oxygen gas mixture in Metal Workshop. Staying safe is important in the shop…trust me. 
The second photo is of my plaster, three part mold of a water bottle that we had to make as an exercise for Intro to Slip Casting. The photo after that is of our teacher and artist Yoko Inoue, demonstrating how to make a mold of a more organic object and shape - ginger! Yoko has so far been one of the most influential and inspiring teachers I’ve studied with here at Bennington. 
The last photo is just of Commons from the End of the World on Commons lawn. The nights are getting shorter and shorter…

Just a little peak into some of the classes that I’m taking this term ~

The first photo is of my friend Whitney Davis, who transferred to Bennington this year, practicing cutting strips of steel with an Acetylene + Oxygen gas mixture in Metal Workshop. Staying safe is important in the shop…trust me. 

The second photo is of my plaster, three part mold of a water bottle that we had to make as an exercise for Intro to Slip Casting. The photo after that is of our teacher and artist Yoko Inoue, demonstrating how to make a mold of a more organic object and shape - ginger! Yoko has so far been one of the most influential and inspiring teachers I’ve studied with here at Bennington. 

The last photo is just of Commons from the End of the World on Commons lawn. The nights are getting shorter and shorter…


Spring ‘13 Schedule

Developing a Color Aesthetic (Photo)

Christianity & Homosexuality (History)

History of Western Art I (Art History)

Collage/Montage (Video)

Screen Printing Workshop (Printmaking)

Adobe Creative Suite for Artists (Digital Arts)